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JACI Study Finds Allergen Immunotherapy Safe, Despite Proposed Regulations

By EDGE | Apr 29
A new study reveals that current allergen immunotherapy is generally very safe.

Japan Abandons Costly X-ray Satellite Lost in Space

Apr 29
Japan's space agency has abandoned its efforts to restore the operations of a multimillion-dollar satellite that was to probe the mysteries of black holes using X-ray telescopes.

SpaceX Aims to Send 'Red Dragon' Capsule to Mars in 2018

By Marcia Dunn | Apr 28
The company's billionaire founder and chief executive Elon Musk announced Wednesday via Twitter that he plans to send a Dragon capsule to land on the red planet as early as 2018.

Alaska Aquarium Replaces Fossil Fuel With Seawater System

By Dan Joling | Apr 28
Thousands of people visit the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward for a look at Steller sea lions or harlequin ducks.

USDA Declines to Pay for Cows, Crops Poisoned by Pesticide

By Kathryn Haake | Apr 27
Despite its potential to poison people and animals, the pesticide is still used for agricultural purposes, including on California strawberry fields and on crops coming into the state at port of entries.

Cambodian Royal Turtle Nearly Extinct - Less Than 10 in Wild

Apr 26
Cambodia's Royal Turtle is nearly extinct, with fewer than 10 left in the wild, because increased sand dredging and illegal clearance of flooded forest have shrunk its habitat, a conservationist group warned Monday.

Silenced by Autism, Young Man Finds His Voice

By Martha Irvine | Apr 25
Benjamin Alexander cannot speak, but he is determined to be heard. He cannot type without a hand to support his, and yet he writes and writes, his inner voice shouting out his thoughts.

Japanese Prototype Stealth Plane Makes First Flight

Apr 24
Japan's first domestically manufactured stealth plane has made its first flight, making Japan one of only a handful of nations with airplane stealth capabilities.

30 Years After Blast, Labor to Clean Chernobyl's Traces

By Dmitry Vlasov | Apr 22
Thirty years after the world's worst nuclear accident, the Chernobyl power plant is surrounded by both desolation and clangorous activity, the sense of a ruined past and a difficult future.

Great American Eclipse Draws Tourists to Path of Totality

By Mead Gruver | Apr 21
Where's the best place to watch next year's eclipse? If you're thinking the grand open spaces of Wyoming, you have plenty of company.

Still Many Questions About Zika's Threat to Pregnant Women

By Lauren Neergaard | Apr 20
Zika may stand convicted of causing devastating birth defects but there still are lots of questions about how much of a threat the virus poses to pregnant women, and what to do about it.

Study Backs Pancreas Cell Transplants for Severe Diabetes

By Lauran Neergaard | Apr 19
Transplants of insulin-producing pancreas cells are a long hoped-for treatment for diabetes - and a new study shows they can protect the most seriously ill patients from a life-threatening complication of the disease.

We All Lie, Scientists Say, But Politicians Even More So

By Seth Borenstein | Apr 18
This is the season of lies. We watch with fascination as candidates for the world's most powerful job trade falsehoods and allegations of dishonesty.

How Urban Research Center in Los Angeles Will Track Bugs

By John Rogers | Apr 18
Scientists at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County unveiled an ambitious plan Thursday to find and catalog every species of bug, reptile and squirrel that flies, crawls, slithers or hops across Southern California.

Canada's Trudeau Explains Quantum Computing In Viral Video

Apr 17
A video has gone viral of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau showing off his geek side by nailing a reporter's question about quantum computing.

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